Sunday, December 30, 2012

Weekend Cooking: Rosettes

rosettes


We're visiting my parents in northwest Wisconsin to celebrate Christmas/New Year's and my Mom brought out the rosettes. Man, talk about heaven. They are so dang melt-in-your-mouth delicious.

A rosette is a thin, cookie-like deep-fried pastry of Scandinavian (Swedish and Norwegian) origin. Rosettes are traditionally made during Christmas time. They are made using intricately designed rosette iron. The iron is heated to a very high temperature in oil, dipped into the batter, then re-immersed in the hot oil to create a crisp shell around the metal. The iron is immediately removed and the rosette is separated from the iron. Usually, the edges of the rosette are dipped into frosting or sugar. Rosette recipes are popular in the United States among families with Scandinavian ancestry.

I found a recipe in my Mom's old, well-loved copy of Betty Crocker's Cooky Book.

Betty Crocker's Cooky Book

Rosettes from Betty Crocker's Cooky Book

1/2 c. Gold Medal Flour
1 Tbls. Sugar
1/2 tsp. Salt
1/2 c. Water or milk
1 egg, slightly beaten
1 Tbls. Vegetable oil
Confectioners' or cinnamon sugar

Measure flour by dipping method or by sifting. Blend dry ingredients together. Mix remaining ingredients together; stir in. Strain mixture. Heat rosette iron in hot fat (400 degrees) 3" deep in small saucepan. Tap off excess fat on absorbent paper. Deep into batter until 2/3 covered. Immerse in hot fat. Fry until delicately browned. Remove; tip upside-down to drain. Push off rosette.

Heat iron in fat again; repeat process. If iron is too cool batter will slip off; if iron is too hot, batter will stick. Stir batter each time before dipping in iron. Sprinkle rosettes with confectioners' or cinnamon sugar. (Best if only made a or two before served.) Store rosettes in single layers in wax paper-lined boxes. Makes 18 rosettes.

Note: If you use Gold Medal self-rising flour, omit salt.


Have a safe and happy New Year's Eve,
Angela




Weekend Cooking, hosted by Beth Fish Reads, is open to anyone who has any kind of food-related post to share: Book
 (novel, nonfiction) reviews, cookbook reviews, movie reviews, recipes,
 random thoughts, gadgets, quotations, beer, wine, photographs. If your
post  is even vaguely foodie, feel free to grab the button and link up 
anytime over the weekend.













20 comments:

  1. Replies
    1. Ohhhh, they ARE. Thanks for coming by, Heidi.

      Delete
  2. Happy New Year!

    My mom is from Minnesota and we are Swedish and Norwegian. Growing up my mom made these delicious cookies every year! I always loved helping her and they just melted in my mouth. I will have to ask her to make them again- or maybe I will surprise her and make them. Thanks for sharing and the stroll down memory lane. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Happy New Year to you too. You're very welcome, Stephanie.

      Delete
  3. Mmmm, these scream MIDWEST to me :) Love them! Northwest WI..hmm, I should have invited myself to your mom's to sample her rosettes, lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That would have been FANTASTIC! Mental note for next year :)

      Delete
  4. Replies
    1. They really are. There are some gorgeous rosette irons available.

      Delete
  5. I agree- the rosettes are just beautiful; what a lovely Christmas tradition.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much for stopping by, Diane.

      Delete
  6. I'm Midwest born and bred and love these too. That cookbook is one of my all-time favorites! It may have been the very first one I owned -- my mom got it for me when I was in junior high or high school. I still have it & still cook from it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so cool! My mom got hers from her mom when she was twelve. The cover is now held on by duct tape (which I didn't include in the photo). I love that old book :)

      Delete
  7. These were a tradition with my MIL's family, except they bought them at local craft bazaars instead of making them, LOL! I agree, they are wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LOL. Yes, they're available in the grocery stores at Christmastime around here too.

      Delete
  8. My Italian-American mother-in-law had an iron for making cookies called pizzelles, but they were cooked on the stovetop or on a waffle-type appliance, not fried. These look lovely too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That is so neat. I just googled them, they're gorgeous. Thank you for sharing :)

      Delete
  9. Those look amazing! I always wondered what those rosette irons were for and if anyone used them. I used to see them at yard sales all the time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course, now that I've been looking for them in thrift shops, I haven't seen a single one in a long time.

      Delete

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...